Establishing the Bureau of Regional History Act

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Establishing the Bureau of Regional History Act
CitationA-18
Enacted byOpen Parliament
Date enacted30 January 2014
Date repealed20 May 2017
Legislative history
Introduced on11 January 2014
Introduced byUnited Democracy of Scientists
Voting began23 January 2014
Required majoritySimple majority
Vote results7 Yea, 0 Nay, 0 Abstain[1]
Repealing legislation
Parliamentary Library Act
Status: Repealed

As of now, the only written documentation of the SLU’s history is an outdated page on the currently inaccessible NSWiki. This causes regional history which could otherwise be recorded to instead be lost and forgotten. The lack of a dedicated archive of regional history can be harmful to the cultural identity, and by extension the community, of a region. As such, this act aims to correct the lack of an official governmental organization for the preservation of the SLU’s history.[2]

Objectives of the Act

Section 1: Hereby establishes the Bureau of Regional History.

Section 2: The Bureau of Regional History shall fall under the direct authority of the Speaker, and the Parliament.

2.1. The Speaker and the Parliament may halt or enforce the realization of any action that the Bureau of Regional History might take through a written statement, or a simple majority vote, respectively.
2.2. The Speaker may revoke a member state’s membership within the Bureau of Regional History for any given reason.

Section 3: The Bureau of Regional History shall be tasked with the following responsibilities:

3.1. Creating a written historical record of current events taking place within the SLU.
3.2. Creating a written historical record of current events taking place outside of the SLU, with coverage of any such given topic requiring approval either by written statement of the Speaker, or by a simple majority vote by the Parliament.
3.3. Ensuring that these historical records from the day that they are published will be permanently and easily accessible to all citizens of both the SLU, and the world.
3.4. Preserving the accuracy, trueness, and objectivity of these historical records, in order to prevent readers of these records from gaining a skewed view of history.

Section 4: In the event that information to be released by the Bureau of Regional History is deemed by the Cabinet to be compromising to the security of the SLU, its allies, or its interests, the Cabinet reserves the right to prevent such information from being published.

4.1. In the event that such information is published by the Bureau of Regional History against the previously stated wishes of the Cabinet, the Cabinet reserves the right to remove this information from being accessible to the public, and member states responsible for the release of this information may be charged with espionage under the Court of Justice.

Section 5: In order to ensure that the above requirements are being met, the member states of the Bureau of Regional History must compile a written report on recently proposed, completed, started, and ongoing projects. These reports must be submitted to the Speaker once every two months.

Section 6: A subsection inside the corresponding section of the forum shall be created in order to support the Bureau of Regional History’s activities and functions, including:

6.1. Storage of the historical records produced by the Bureau of Regional History, if such storage on the forums is needed.
6.2. Discussion by member states of the Bureau of Regional History of the activities and functions of the Bureau, and the writing of historical records.
6.3. Discussion of historical events pertaining to the Bureau of Regional History by the public.

Section 7: In order for nations to join the Bureau of Regional History, they must send a telegram of application to the Speaker, who may then accept or decline the application. Once accepted, the given state becomes a member state of the Bureau of Regional History.

7.1. The application telegram must state whether or not the applying nation would wish to work as an archivist, a researcher, or both. Archivists shall be tasked with the writing, publishing, and distribution of the historical records. Researchers shall be tasked with the gathering of information to submit to the archivists for the writing of historical records, and the composition of the bimonthly reports to the Speaker.